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69. Wonders in the Woods

In 1980s, Stories, United States on August 17, 2010 at 8:22 pm

photo from Moody’s Postcard Blog

Tucked into a corner of North-Central Massachusetts in the farthest reaches of Worcester County, Winchendon is rather like the Bermuda Triangle in its obscurity and extreme weather; people can vanish there. When we first moved out there from the Boston area in 1983, I was apprehensive about making friends and fitting in. In acreage, Winchendon is one of the largest towns in the state and probably one of the most wooded, but in population it is one of the smallest, and I was afraid that I would be entering a culturally homogeneous community where I would never be able to feel at home.

In some respects I was right, in that I soon found that only a native of Winchendon could ever really be seen to be from Winchendon; all others would forever be considered outsiders. With housing prices soaring in the Reagan years, Winchendon was fast becoming a bedroom community for people who worked in the Route 495 belt, Greater Boston’s outer ring road. For them, as for us, Winchendon was affordable. However, for Winchendon natives, this development was driving up housing prices to the extent that their own children would not be able to afford to live there, even supposing that they could find work in the area. It was only natural that they would be suspicious of us newcomers.

In the hope of being accepted more readily, I joined a local church choir and became a stringer for the town newspaper, writing news and feature stories. As a reporter it was permissible to call townspeople and ask them for personal interviews and they in turn had a pretext for inviting me into their homes. One of my projects—which soon put paid to my preconceptions of the town as culturally homogeneous—was a series of pieces on the different ethnic groups in Winchendon, starting with the Irish and followed by the French Canadians, the Finns, and the Cambodians. I remember a conversation with two of my readers, an outspoken middle-aged woman, who objected to the story about the French Canadians on the grounds that my main source was too critical of the mill owners, and her timid friend.

Woman: What gives her the right to speak? She isn’t even a native.

Timid friend: But my dear, her husband is a native, and she has lived in  Winchendon for 25 years, ever since her marriage.

Woman: But she was born in Holyoke!

Case closed.

Winchendon, along with nearby Athol, was an economically depressed community that had never recovered from the flight of Massachusetts-based industries to the South to avoid unions and fair wages for their workers. In fact, the first concert I attended in the area was a 1983 fund-raiser by Pete Seeger to benefit the workers locked out from an Athol factory. That factory never re-opened. Winchendon was still called Toytown, and had been known throughout the country in the 1900s for manufacturing wooden rocking horses, but that factory was long gone. Winchendon had been a big railroad junction, with trains stopping there en route to Boston, New York City, Albany, and Montreal. Sadly, by the 1980s, the old railroad tracks were being pulled up, and the commuter rail line from Boston stopped well short of Winchendon in Fitchburg, 20 miles to the East. A lone bus plying the route between Boston and Burlington, Vermont stopped there once a day, at the corner of Route 12 and Central Street, where the hitching posts of yesteryear still stood sturdily alongside the Johnny-come-lately parking meters.

As a newcomer myself, I was worried about becoming culturally isolated in Winchendon. But the first party Andrew and I were invited to, in the neighboring town of Royalston, was the ten-year anniversary celebration of a community of people who had moved out to the country in the early 1970s, reminding me that we were Johnny-come-latelies to the back-to-the-land movement; people had trod this path before us. I still remember finding my way back successfully from that party in the woods, driving down narrow, winding country roads with not one single street light all the whole way home.

Our next party, also held in the woods at night just a week or so later, was even more eye-opening. As I was picking my way round in the dark through a crowd of complete strangers, a figure loomed out of the shadows and introduced himself as Bill. I soon learned that Bill was on the verge of cracking the as-yet-unintelligible astronomical code of the Incas. When, in the course of the conversation, I mentioned that my father was Indian, he amazed me by breaking out into streetwise Hindustani, something I would have least expected in the wilds of North-Central Massachusetts. We would get to know Bill and his English wife Penny a little more over the next few years. She would order a wheel of Double Gloucester cheese from our preorder food co-op every month. And when he was not code-cracking, the multi-talented Bill was morris-dancing with a local troupe of merrie men who performed at the solstices and other pagan holidays.

But the biggest surprise at that party in the woods was yet to come. After Bill had drifted away, I thought I heard someone call my name. At first I disregarded it, assuming that I must be mistaken, since nobody there knew me, but the voice called out to me once again and I turned around to see Ginny, my sister’s contemporary and the younger daughter of a family whom my parents had first met in India when I was six months old. The father was Indian like mine, from the same part of the country and the same community, and the mother American, so that their children were half-Indian, as we were. I had played with Ginny’s elder brother Jimmy as a toddler, and then our families had lost touch for fifteen years; until, as a new immigrant to the U.S., my father had coincidentally spotted them crossing the street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, bringing their now-17-year-old son Jimmy to visit MIT. The second coincidence came some six years later on my sister Sally’s first day of freshman orientation at Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass. Somebody called our name, and we looked round to see this very family, our mysterious doubles, also bringing their younger daughter to her first day at Hampshire. Now here she was, some six years later still, inexplicably at the same party in the back of beyond. It turned out that she had moved to the town of Greenfield, some 20 miles further west, and had come with a friend who knew one of our hosts.

After that party, I no longer feared isolation in my new home. There were wonders hidden in the woods of Winchendon and its environs, the most fascinating people we could ever hope to meet. Today, almost exactly twenty years since we left Winchendon, some of them remain our dearest friends.

For another story about living in Winchendon, see

TMA 127. Going Up the Country

Tell Me Another

457. Farming

In 1980s, blogs and blogging, Childhood, Nature, parenting, Stories, United States, Work on April 7, 2020 at 11:01 pm

This is the sixth entry in a month-long series, Fifty years in the United States: An immigrant’s perspective, as part of the annual Blogging from A to Z Challenge.

Farming.

From 1984 to 1990 Andrew and I lived with friends from the Boston area on a 60-acre farm in Winchendon, a small town in North-Central Massachusetts. In truth it was mostly woods, with less than 20 acres of cleared land, an old red farmhouse and barn, and a run-down chicken coop. We had been having conversations since 1977 about forming some kind of collective and moving to a farm, sustained economically by some of us having paying jobs in the community; but when push came to shove most of the others bailed out, all of them economically more solvent than we were, and in the end there were just five of us. Since 1980 Andrew and I had been running a small press in the Boston area with his sister Eve, moving to the farm meant shuttling back and forth to Boston every week, which we had to do until we could move the operation to the repurposed chicken coop. Letterpress printers don’t make much money, still less when half the customers, mostly environmental groups and community organizations, get a political discount; but we had to keep working at the press and couldn’t afford to get involved in another marginal start-up. In the end our housemates started a small business growing perennials and eventually added a CSA, delivering vegetables in season to local families and our friends in the city, while all five of us maintained a big kitchen garden for our own use, including putting by large quantities of food to carry us through the winters.

It was hard farming in Winchendon, which turned out to be just about the coldest town in the state, so the growing season was very short, from after Memorial Day in late May to the week before Labor Day in late August, so one couldn’t grow crops that needed an extended period of heat, like okra or peanuts. But we were still able to grow a few crops that normally thrived in the heat because we ordered from Johnny’s up in Maine who developed seeds especially for northern climes, including a terrific variety of hot chili pepper.  Maureen and Rudy had the forethought to put in strawberries and asparagus for rare times of pure extravagance, and we produced a wealth of potatoes, onions, carrots, peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, beans and leafy greens of all kinds, and lots of culinary herbs. I say “we” loosely: I was never really a farmer, though I benefited from the hard work and expertise of the others. I helped a little with the weeding, killed potato beetles and tomato hornworms when they threatened our precious crops, collected eggs from the hens, picked when it was time to harvest, cooked, and ate my share—and then some.

But however isolated the community, inhospitable the climate, and rocky the soil, living on a farm was idyllic in the dark decade of the Reagan Years, when all our social activism of the previous decade seemed to have come to nought, when the very concept of society and community was under challenge by the defunding of the public sector and an ethos of individualism. We were actively engaged with raising our children–Andrew and I had one child and Maureen and Rudy another, three months apart, so Nikhil and Eric were brothers. They played at farming with Playmobil (Eric’s first word was “tractor”) and grew their first crop of scarlet runner beans at age four out of a seed packet they’d brought home as a party favor from the birthday party of a little friend of theirs, whose parents were also farmers.

In the mid-1980s, at the very time when we moved to our little farm, American farming was in crisis. Many farms, particularly in the Midwest, were up for sale. Farm debt had recently skyrocketed and now prices had collapsed and incomes were plummeting. It all added up to a consolidation of land in big farms, and small and medium-size farmers going out of business.  According to Iowa PBS, the “trend toward very large farms was initiated during the 1980s and it continues unabated up to the present day.” In September 1985 dozens of artists, organized by Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, and Neil Young, organized Farm Aid, that started as a benefit concert that raised $9 million to save family farms, and still continues as a nonprofit organization whose mission is to keep them on the land.

Interestingly, a parallel movement to the consolidation of land in mega-farms has been a “concurrent, ongoing trend. . .for the development of small family farming enterprises, mostly organic, that is producing many new farm people” (Iowa PBS). The little farm we lived on, at least the business side of it–I can’t claim any credit for the work–was part of that movement as a member of NOFA, the Northeast Organic Farming Association, catering to the growing desire for high-quality organically grown produce (hence our hand-culling of potato beetles and tomato hornworms).

Although compared to the average American farm, our production was small potatoes (our ascerbic housemate Charlie Gamble got a kick out of near-obsolete agricultural idioms); although it never made anyone a living; and although complaints about the weather and arguments among the adults were a-plenty, we certainly put in our share of honest effort, and our son spent his formative years unplugged, in small-town America, living on a farm.

Here’s The Who singing Now I’m a Farmer: and I’m digging, digging, digging, digging, digging.
And here are more stories of life on the farm:

127. Going Up the Country

69. Wonders in the Woods

10. Ghosts of New Boston

86. Bottled Sunshine

177. The Sugar Snow

Tell Me Another (Contents to Date)

Chronological Table of Contents

242. Gratitude

In history, Inter/Transnational, Music, people, Politics, Stories, United States on January 28, 2014 at 4:56 am

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The sad news of Pete Seeger’s death came in just as I was drifting off to sleep and I could not just let it pass. So grateful for the life of this tireless champion of peace, justice, love, and the power of song. Here’s Pete back in 1963, teaching a crowd to sing his If I Had a Hammer in his inimitable way.  

It’s the hammer of justice
It’s the bell of freedom
It’s the song about love between my brothers and my sisters
All over this land.

Here he is in 2009, teaching the audience some of the more subversive verses to Woody Guthrie’s This Land is Your Land, the song that would be the national anthem, if I had my druthers.

pete-seeger-banjo-1

Looking back at my own life, Pete Seeger’s music runs through it like a rainbow thread, as I grew up to his songs long before I had ever heard his name. It was thanks to Pete Seeger that I learned most of my first American folk songs, thanks to Pete Seeger that I am inspired to join with others in song when everything looks bleak and hopeless, thanks in no small part to Pete Seeger that folk music has been alive and well this past half-century and more. Here he is leading the audience in This Little Light of Mine at the 50th anniversary of the Newport Folk Festival, which he helped to found.  He learned, sang, and championed the songs of Woody Guthrie, Leadbelly, and so many more, from all over the world.

Looking back at Tell Me Another, I find his name invoked again and again, from some of the very earliest stories to the most recent one:

18. Songlines

64. Concert Collage

69. Wonders in the Woods

124. A Meditation on Money

241. People, Not Personalities

I had the good fortune to see him twice in concert. The first time was back in 1983, just as we were deciding to move to Winchendon, at an outdoor benefit concert he gave in neighboring Athol, Massachusetts, for workers who had been locked out of their factory. The second time was some fifteen years later, with Nikhil as a teenager, at the grand old Academy of Music in Northampton, Massachusetts. He was old now, singing with his grandson, returning to his musical roots. I think he sang Guantanamera, my father-in-law Ted’s favorite song, and—secular to the core though he was—his own version of Old Hundredth. But he was to keep on singing and keep on making history for another 15 years. Here he is not six months ago, in conversation with Amy Goodman after his 94th birthday and the death of his wife Toshi.

pete090504_250Here are Harry Belafonte and Arlo Guthrie honoring him back in 1996; and here he is, accepting that honor, for once at a loss for words.

Thank you, Pete Seeger: you are Forever Young.

CODA, 2020: Two years after Pete Seeger, my own father passed away. I wrote Land Where Our Fathers Died a year later.

Tell Me Another (Contents to Date)

Chronological Table of Contents

Chronological Table of Contents

In Notes on December 17, 2011 at 10:55 pm

Tell Me Another now includes 512 stories and has logged more than 250,000 page views from 173 different countries. I’ve been writing and posting the stories in a random order as they occur to me, and you can read them in that order in Contents to Date, but I thought I’d make a new table of contents with the stories listed in a loosely chronological order, starting with stories told to me of times before my birth and some of my earliest memories.

53. Sucking Lemons and Quoting Shaw (G)

36. My Grandmother

70. Party Pieces (G)

33. A Nice Bit of Spanish (G)

17. Chickens on the Pot

111. Strawberry-Picking Camp (G)

492. Notting Hill Bedsitter, 1950s

94. My Uncrowned Queens (G)

133. So Many Things Have Disappeared (G)

148. Avoiding the Plague (G)

149.  Get Me to the Church on Time (G)

20. The Bay of Biscay and the Gully Gully Man (G)

26. Dolls I Have Loved (and Lost) (G)

207. The Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò (G)

75. The Long Journey (G)

43. From a Railway Carriage (G)

18. Songlines

44. Greece in the 60s: Expats and Other Animals (G)

96. Learning to Swim (G)

34. His Master’s Voice (G)

104. Untangling (G)

11. The Napkin Collection

251. Deutschland (or Germany?) (G)

120. I once was lost (and wish I still were) (G)

138. Learning How (Not) to See (G)

81. St. Catherine’s and Miss Tutte (G)

134. Darshan, or You Never Can Tell (G)

45. A Macabre Imagination?

107. Kalo Paska (G)

59. Childhood Scars

378. Xýpna / Ξύπνα (G)

62. Regulation Underwear (G)

25. British TV, Fall of ‘63 (G)

32. My Wrestling Career

109 Hindi Lessons (G)

7. The Comic Shed (G)

112. Хоттабыч in India (G)

190. Hobson-Jobson (G)

113. Riding Like the Wind (G)

12. Following the Elephant Spoor

146. Life on the Low Wire (G)

28. Pre-dawn Adventures (G)

147. Hollyhocks and Hornworms (G)

16. Tree Elf

63. Secrecy and Velvet Bugs (G)

187. Emil and the Detectives (G)

188. Finn Family Moomintroll (G)

49. Making Sense of the Movies (G)

35. The Nation (G)

160. Dogfight (G)

167. Diary-keeping (G)

46. My Ink-Smudged Youth (G)

48. Jaggery Coconut, Nectar of the Gods (G)

143. Waste Not, Want Not (G)

68. Frittered!

71. Simply Paying Attention

24. Hidden Places (G)

52. Himalaya (G)

38. Study Halls and Cinchona (G)

206. Xenophobia (G)

60. Cod-Liver Oil and Malt (G)

  1. Dancing in the Street

27. Rumpelstiltskin (G)

54. Flash

119. Top of the Pops, 1968-69 (G)

67. Fiasco on the 715 (G)

47. The Paper Round (G)

168. The Fast-Wind Backwards (G)

125. My Autograph Book (G)

83. A Clear, Cold New England Day

95. Sail On, Silver Girl

6. Morse’s Supermarket

214.  A Moment in Time (G)

215. Remembering Mrs. Metzger (G)

84. Feasting or Fasting? (G)

310. Godine (G)

246. On Not Knowing the Signs (G)

4. The Tree House (G)

8. Bad Role Model

  1. Bangladesh

485. Our Old Kitchen Knife

238. The Diabolical Idea of the Sale (G)

162. “Heuch, Heuch!” (and other family lingo) (G)

92. Cookbooks, Immigrants, and Improvisation (G)

141. The Yogi of Beals Street (G)

181. The Silver Hairpin (G)

40. send my roots rain (G)

179. And he laughing said to me (G)

137. A Victorian Frame of Mind (G)

31. Gas-Station Shirts (G)

89. Make Love, Not Clockwork Devil-Doggery (G)

88. Sisters, Pick Up Your Sisters (G)

163. Servants, or Cleaning My Own D*** House! (G)

55. Quick-Change Artist

57. Toughening Up

3. The Horn Player in the Cupboard (G)

164. Pheasants and Apple Chutney (G)

5. Idolizing Princess Anne (G)

347. Free Speech: Goodbye to All That? (G)

41. Eating for Four (G)

155. Saving my Bacon (G)

39. Two at a Time (G)

110. The Party (G)

1. Letting Go of the Clutch (G)

142. Route 66 (G)

23. Brackish Water and Cherry Soda (G)

158. The Pagli and the Tramp

454. Cooperation

234. “Ah, bitter chill it was!” (G)

144. The Blab-Off (G)

151. Correspondences and Convergence (“Chicks Can’t Dig!”) (G)

344. Tropical Botanicals (G)

157. The Day Mick Jagger Called (G)

72. Learnin’ the Blues (G)

135. Doris Lessing and Me (G)

14. Everett the Ice Man (G)

150. The Phenomenon (G)

159. Ordinary People (G)

22. Mushrooming and Berry-Picking (G)

  1. Pre-dawn Raga (G)
  1. Stone Root Lane (G)

2. The Leather Welding Jacket

114. Food for People , Not for Profit (G)

29. Incident at the Donner Pass (G)

284. Step by Step (G)

337. Lessons from a Historian (G)

116. Medicinal Herbs (G)

200. Roots, Rock, Reggae (G)

37. Grandpa Victor and the Story of the Tomatoes

128. The Kurta Joke (G)

170. Sighting in New Mexico (G)

30. Land of Enchantment (G)

483. The Singing Cowboy: Heart Core Meltdown

  1. Not So Posh (G)

221. Dressing for Others (G)

102. No Nuclear News (G)

61. Burma-Shave Signs (G)

9. The Golden Boy

335. Are you Black or White? (G)

  1. On TP Rolls and Responsibility (G)

192. Jam Today (G)

484. Home Truths

82. What’s Your Bag? (G)

313. Job Printers (G)

  1. Whetstone Press (G)
  1. Of Matrices, Magazines, and Melting Pots (G)

457. Farming

127. Going Up the Country (G)

69. Wonders in the Woods (G)

10. Ghosts of New Boston (G)

108. Climb Over the Wall! (G)

99. Paharganj, January 1984

21. The Highlanders (G)

384. Auntie Bette’s Litmus Test (G)

165. What’s in a Name? (G)

152. No Swaddling, Please! (G)

77. The Tea Tasting (G)

218. No Baby No Cry* (G)

460. Immigrants

86. Bottled Sunshine (G)

13. Paradise Lost

65. Curb Your Enthusiasm: A Bedtime Story (G)

  1. Householder

224. Play-Acting (G)

208. Zee, Zed, Go to Bed (G)

177. The Sugar Snow (G)

  1. Without Whom (G)

186. Drive-ins (G)

180. The Magic of Found Objects (G)

197. O, Oh, and the Wonderful O (G)

  1. Graduate School
  1. Reaganomics 101 (G)

176. The Haircut (G)

185. Common Sense (G)

  1. The Kuwait Phenomenon

50. Learning How to Fold

(G) 252. In the Eurozone

(G) 42. The Times Tables (G)

91. Tunneling (G)

191. The Iliad at Bedtime (G)

213. Censorship at Bedtime (G)

201. Screaming Women (G)

466. Originals and Adaptations

161. Watching the River Flow (G)

232. Before Interstates, Before Automobiles (G)

199. Quest (G)

240. Heaven’s Gate: Two Degrees of Separation (G)

19. Lively Up Yourself (G)

85. St. Nicholas’ Day (G)

100. My American Epiphany

174. Con Men, Card Sharks, and Playing a Different Game (G)

139. Sealed with a Kiss (G)

118. Racist Bracist (G)

  1. Quagmire

15. Humans—What a Bummer! (G)

227. The Commanding Self (G)

80. Who Are You? (G)

64. Concert Collage (G)

140 Music Alone Shall Live (G)

145. Just a little is enough. (G)

117. Personal Space, Indian-Style (G)

87. Thanda Thanda Pani or, You Never Miss Your Water… (G)

225. Audit Alert! (G)

76. Say it Again (G)

222. Dropping In (G)

79. Baths, Bathing, and Hot Water Bottles (G)

194. London, My London (G)

189. Goodness Gracious Me! (G)

103. Holi, Water Play, Rites of Spring (G)

301. Babysitting (G)

98. Oral Culture (so to speak) (G)

58. Southbound

467. “Post-9/11”

  1. Middle Age

90. “Almost a Dude” (G)

73. Trouble (G)

51. Getting Out of Silver City (G)

93. Snowed In (G)

97. Sick in Bed (G)

129. Good Morning, Rainy Day (G)

132. My Muddle (G)

130. Orwellian Jingles (G)

203. Ultra (G)

105. My Garden of Forking Paths (G)

247. Gauri Deshpande: A Distinctive Voice (G)

205. Weeping Willow (G)

282. It’s Only Temporary (G)

486. Fingerprinted and Found Wanting

126. Word Choice: Does it Matter? (G)

74. Three Towers, Three Coincidences

101. The Japan Syndrome (G)

271. Yellowcake and other Euphemisms (G)

122. The Land of the Free—Really? (G)

124. A Meditation on Money (G)

241. People, not Personalities (G)

270. The Challenge of X (G)

243. On Making Things Up (G)

242. Gratitude (G)

136. The Shame of Self-Censorship (G)

56. International Arrivals (G)

123. That Funny Accent (G)

211. Bad Behavior on the Bus (G)

115. An Immigrant’s Reflections on Independence Day (G)

66. The Mango Room (G)

131. Across the Miles (G)

198. The Post Office (G)

153. Piecing It All Together (G)

156. Just Empty your Mind

175. Make It So! (G)

154. Saraswati and Sari-wearing (G)

121. The Taste of Home (G)

245. Welcome Home (G)

273. Everyday Use (G)

106. Slow: Salamander Crossing (G)

209. Retreat (G)

202. Tennessee Stud (G)

78. October Rains (G)

166. In the Bleak Midwinter (G)

169.  At the Gates of Dawn (G)

287. Anywhere, anywhere (G)

217. Regularity (G)

171. Dashing Away with the Smoothing Iron (G)

229. The Saga of the Sage-Green Couch (G)

223. Darn It! (G)

244. A Chip off the Old Block? If Only. (G)

172. Balancing My Three Halves (G)

173. Multi-Timing (G)

178. Talkin’ ’bout My Generation (G)

303. Use Proper English You’re Regarded as a Freak* (G)

182. Hot Cross Buns (G)

204. Victory V’s (G)

183. Autoantonyms (G)

184. Brevity (G)

193. Kindling (G)

195.  Marathon (G)

196. Never No More (G)

210. The Potters’ Tale (G)

212. ¡Viva La Literatura! (G)

216. The Third Age

219. Palimpsest (G)

236. Living Language: Changing, Impure (G)

220. How’s Your GK? (G)

226. Consider the lilies of the field (G)

288. Bless Them (G)

228. The Mistress-Servant Relationship (G)

239. No, It’s Not Political Incorrectness (G)

230. Enjoy Yourself (It’s Later than You Think) (G)

231. Festivals of Light (G)

233. Rest In Peace, Doris Lessing (G)

235. December 5th, 2013 (G)

237. Turning Towards the Light (G)

274. In the Dark

248. Air Travel (G)

249. Baggage (G)

250. Culture (G)

253. Food, Bremen-style (G)

254. (On not knowing) German (G)

255. Holidays (G)

256. Interior Design (G)

257. (Leaving on a) Jet Plane (G)

258. Kuchen (G)

260. Monuments (G)

269. Walls (G)

259. London without Lily (G)

261. Nostalgia (G)

262. Oh, to be in England (G)

263. Quiet (G)

264. Railways, Real and Imagined (G)

265. Swagmen (G)

266. Tea (G) 267. U and Non-U (G)

268. Variations, Variety, Vocab (G)

272. Zindagi (G)

275. Doing it Themselves (G)

276. India: Day 5 (G)

277. Waiting for Some Time (G)

278. Going Back, Coming Home (G)

279. Raking, or In Praise of Puttering (G)

280. My Love Affair with Penguins (G)

281. Invasion of the Potato Beetles (G)

283. Categories or Continuums? (G)

285. Sometimes a Coincidence (G)

286. Foxfire (G)

287. Anywhere, anywhere (G)

289. Only So Much (G)

290. Krishna’s Butterball (G)

292. No Returns (G)

293. All the World’s a Stage (G)

295. Changes (G)

  1. The Hundred-Foot Journey after Charlie Hebdo (G)

297. Metamorphosis? (G)

  1. Time Travel (Birthdays and Birthday Books) (G)

300. Mistrusting My Inner Voice (G)

  1. Brooding* (G)

304. Against the Grain (G)

305. Bed (G)

306. Composition (G)

307. Deadline (G)

308. Ems, Ens, and Endpapers (G)

309. Folding, Flying, Bleeding, Pieing. . . (G)

311. The Hogarth Press (G)

312. Impression/Imposition (Kiss or Bite?) (G)

314. Kern(ing) (G)

315. Ligatures (G)

317. The Nick (G)

318. Out of Sorts (G)

  1. (Mind your) p’s and q’s
  1. Quoin that Phrase (G)

321.  Recto (G)

322. Stereotyping (G)

323. Tympan and Times Roman (G)

324. Upper Case (and lower case) (G)

  1. Verso (G)

327. x-Height (G)

328. Yellow Journalism (G)

329. Zapf, Zubaan, Zinc-etching, Zzzzz . . . (G)

  1. Ruth Rendell: Dead-On (G)
  1. No Rush (G)
  1. Lost in the Supermarket (G)

333. Like Some Forgotten Dream (G)

334. Rockers (G)

  1. Time’s Wingèd Chariot (G)

338. Self-doubt (G)

  1. It’s the Way That You Do It (G)

340. Coastal Connections (G)

  1. Unexpected Fruit (G)

342. Inscriptions (G)

  1. European Border Crossings (G)

346. Keeping Up with The Times (G)

  1. On Tap (G)
  1. A Chair for My Mother (G)

350. Lest We Forget (G)

351. Slow Food from Way Back (G)

352. Parents Modeling Manners (G)

353. Solapuris (G)

354. The Pursuit of Happiness (G)

  1. Accomplishment (G)
  1. Bookshops (G)
  1. The Guardian (G)
  1. Henion’s (G)
  1. India (G)
  1. Jai Jagat! (G)
  1. Kindred (G)
  1. Lemons and Limes (G)
  1. Movement (G)
  1. Night (G)
  1. the Outdoors (G)
  1. Quirks (G)
  1. Real Country (G)

373. Singing (G)

374. Thrift Stores (G)

375. Unions (G)

376. Verandas (G)

377. Writing (G)

379. Young People (G)

380. Zoe

381. Cousin Mischa (G)

  1. What’s Wrong with “Oriental”? (G)
  1. It’s a Process (G)

385. On Two Girls Running (G)

386. When the Law Breaks the Law (G)

  1. It Wants To Be Found (G)

389. Exposing Whose Perversity? (G)

390. When You’re Pulled Over (G)

391.  buying up the whole store (G)

  1. Pecking Order (G)

393. Flying those Flags (G)

394. Scattergram, Spring 2017 (G)

395. “Oh, Rob!” (G)

396. Missing Ted (G)

397. Why Should Not Old Women Be Mad? (G)

398. This day . . . (G)

399. East of What? (G)

  1. Why Pay those Union Dues? (G)

401. More Than Enough (G)

402. Land Where Our Fathers Died (G)

403. Free from Thought (G)

404. Colo(u)rs (G)

405. Not So Grinchy (G)

  1. Of Piercings, Pain, and Authenticity (G)

407. Inner Light (G)

408. Every Light in the House Burnin’

409. A is for Alien (also Arrival, Assimilation, and Asylum)

410. B is for Border

411. C is for Citizen[ship]

412. D: Detention and Deportation

413. E is for Emigrant, Expatriate, and Exile

414. F: Family Separation

415. G is for the Great Migration

416. H is for Homeland

417. I is for “Internment”/Incarceration

418. J is for Journey

419. Three Ks: Kamala Markandaya, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Kamila Shamsie

420.  M: Migrant Crisis

421. N is for Nationalists and Nationalisms

422. One Love

 423. P is for Passport

424. Q is for Quarantine

425. R is for Refugees

426. S is for Stranger

427. T is for Temporary Status

428. Unalienable Rights

429. V is for Vigilante

430.Walls

431. Y is for Youth

432. Zero-tolerance Policy

433. No particular place to go

434. Friends from Way Back

435. Wild Things

436. Feel-good, feeling good

437. Wide Awake

438. “I never died,” says he

439. Of Damp Squibs and Other Watery Slurs

440. Why this Fussing and Fighting?

441. Mere Customers

  1. Mind Cleanup

445. A November Gift: Rosemary for Remembrance

449. The Farthest Field

461. John Prine

463.  Love, Longing, and Living in the Moment

469. Return

  1. Social Media
  1. T_ *_ *_ *_ *
  1. Under Pressure
  1. Violence

474. Water Protectors

475. XR — Extinction Rebellion US

476. Youth (and Age) in a Changing America

477. Zoom

478. Sheer Cruelty

  1. Of Accessibility

480. A Burning

481. Ghost Town

482. Knowledge and Right Action

487. Virtual RUSH II (post-election playlist)

488. The Sitting Tenant

489. For Unto Us a Child is Born 

490. A Continuation

  1. Anticipation, Not Dread

493. Animalidioms

  1. Britishisms
  1. Clothes and Clothing
  1. Euphemisms
  2. Remembering Mum on Mother’s Day
  3. Thoughts on Fathers and Fatherhood
  4. Late-Summer Morning
  5. The Small Things
  6. Farewell, Old House!
  7. Five Years Out
  8. Things are Looking Up
  9. My Cup
  10. The Loudest Voice
  11. Marking Time
  12. Wordplay
  13. Proceeding by Indirection
  14. School’s (Nearly) Out
  15. Start as you mean to go on.
  16. My Champion

     

     

Contents to Date

In Notes on November 19, 2010 at 2:10 pm

Here’s a hyperlinked list of all the stories posted to date: just click on the title to read the story. Check out the world map at the bottom of the page: since February 28th, 2010, readers from 173 countries and counting.

512. My Champion

511. Start as you mean to go on.

510. School’s (Nearly) Out

509. Proceeding by Indirection

508. Wordplay

507. Marking Time

506. The Loudest Voice

505. My Cup

504. Things are Looking Up

    1. Five Years Out

502. Farewell, Old House! 

    1. The Small Things
    1. Late-Summer Morning

499. Thoughts on Fathers and Fatherhood

498. Remembering Mum on Mother’s Day

497. Euphemisms

    1. Dancing in the Street

495. Clothes and Clothing

494. Britishisms

493. Animalidioms

 492. Notting Hill Bedsitter, 1950s

    1. Anticipation, Not Dread
    1. A Continuance

489. For Unto Us a Child is Born

488. The Sitting Tenant

487. Virtual RUSH II (post-election playlist)

486. Fingerprinted and Found Wanting

485. Our Old Kitchen Knife

484. Home Truths

483. The Singing Cowboy: Heart Core Meltdown

482. Knowledge and Right Action

481. Ghost Town

480. A Burning

    1. Of Accessibility

478. Sheer Cruelty

    1. Zoom
    1. Youth (and Age) in a Changing America
    1. XR — Extinction Rebellion US

 474. Water Protectors

    1. Violence
    1. Under Pressure
    1. T_ *_ *_ *_ *
    1. Social Media

469. Return

    1. Quagmire

467. “Post-9/11”

466. Originals and Adaptations

    1. New England and New Mexico
    1. Middle Age

463.  Love, Longing, and Living in the Moment

462. The Kuwait Phenomenon

461. John Prine

    1. Immigrants
    1. Householder
    1. Graduate School

457. Farming

456. The Eighties

    1. Dual Identities
    1. Cooperation

453. Bangladesh

    1. America

451. Life Depends On It

450. A Virtual RUSH

       449. The Farthest Field

       448. Returning to Little Women

       447. Christmas is Coming

       446. Musings on Multiculturalism

       445. A November Gift: Rosemary for Remembrance

444. Mind Cleanup

443. An Ill Wind (or, A portent and two strange things)

442. Rest In Peace, Kumud Rege (June 29, 1922 to October 5, 2019)

441. Mere Customers

440. Why this Fussing and Fighting?

439. Of Damp Squibs and Other Watery Slurs

438.“I never died,” says he

       437. Wide Awake

436. Feel-good, feeling good

435. Wild Things

434. Friends from Way Back

433. No particular place to go

432. Zero-tolerance Policy

431. Y is for Youth

430.Walls

429. V is for Vigilante

428. Unalienable Rights

427. T is for Temporary Status

426. S is for Stranger

425. R is for Refugees

424. Q is for Quarantine

 423. P is for Passport

422. One Love

421. N is for Nationalists and Nationalisms

 420.  M: Migrant Crisis

419. Three Ks: Kamala Markandaya, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Kamila Shamsie

418. J is for Journey

417. I is for “Internment”/Incarceration

416. H is for Homeland

415. G is for the Great Migration

414. F: Family Separation

413. E is for Emigrant, Expatriate, and Exile

412. D: Detention and Deportation

411. C is for Citizen[ship]

410. B is for Border

409. A is for Alien (also Arrival, Assimilation, and Asylum)

408. Every Light in the House Burnin’

407. Inner Light (G)

  1. Of Piercings, Pain, and Authenticity (G)

405. Not So Grinchy (G)

404. Colo(u)rs (G)

    403. Free from Thought (G)

    402. Land Where Our Fathers Died (G)

401. More Than Enough (G)

    400. Why Pay those Union Dues? (G)

    399. East of What? (G)

    398. This day . . . (G)

    397. Why Should Not Old Women Be Mad? (G)

   396. Missing Ted (G)

   395. “Oh, Rob!” (G)

   394. Scattergram, Spring 2017 (G)

   393. Flying those Flags (G)

   392.  Pecking Order (G)

   391.  buying up the whole store (G)

   390. When You’re Pulled Over (G)

   389. Exposing Whose Perversity? (G)

  1. It Wants To Be Found (G)
  1. Not So Posh (G)

386. When the Law Breaks the Law (G)

385. On Two Girls Running (G)

384. Auntie Bette’s Litmus Test (G)

  1. It’s a Process (G)
  1. What’s Wrong with “Oriental”? (G)
  1. Cousin Mischa (G)
  1. Zoe
  1. Young People (G)
  1. Xýpna / Ξύπνα (G)
  1. Writing (G)
  1. Verandas (G)
  1. Unions (G)
  1. Thrift Stores (G)
  1. Singing (G)
  1. Real Country (G)
  1. Quirks (G)
  1. Pre-dawn Raga (G)
  1. the Outdoors (G)

368. Night (G)

367. Movement (G)

  1.  Lemons and Limes (G)
  1. Kindred (G)
  1. Jai Jagat! (G)
  1. India (G)

362. Henion’s (G)

  1. The Guardian (G)

360. Friends (G)

359. EastEnders (G)

358. Darjeeling (G)

357. Chillies and China (G)

  1. Bookshops (G)
  1. Accomplishment (G)

354. The Pursuit of Happiness (G)

353. Solapuris (G)

352. Parents Modeling Manners (G)

351. Slow Food from Way Back (G)

350. Lest We Forget (G)

349. A Chair for My Mother (G)

348. On Tap (G)

347. Free Speech: Goodbye to All That? (G)

346. Keeping Up with The Times (G)

345. Reaganomics 101 (G)

344. Tropical Botanicals (G)

343. European Border Crossings (G)

342. Inscriptions (G)

341. Unexpected Fruit (G)

340. Coastal Connections (G)

339. It’s the Way That You Do It (G)

338. Self-doubt (G)

337. Lessons from a Historian (G)

336. Time’s Wingèd Chariot (G)

335. Are you Black or White? (G)

334. Rockers (G)

333. Like Some Forgotten Dream (G)

332. Lost in the Supermarket (G)

331. No Rush (G)

330. Ruth Rendell: Dead-On (G)

329. Zapf, Zubaan, Zinc-etching, Zzzzz . . . (G)

328. Yellow Journalism (G)

327. x-Height (G)

326. Whetstone Press (G)

325. Verso (G)

324. Upper Case (and lower case) (G)

323. Tympan and Times Roman (G)

322. Stereotyping (G)

321. Recto (G)

320. Quoin that Phrase (G)

319. (Mind your) p’s and q’s (G)

318. Out of Sorts (G)

317. The Nick (G)

316. Of Matrices, Magazines, and Melting Pots (G)

315. Ligatures (G)

314. Kern(ing) (G)

313. Job Printers (G)

312. Impression/Imposition (Kiss or Bite?) (G)

311. The Hogarth Press (G)

310. Godine (G)

309. Folding, Flying, Bleeding, Pieing. . . (G)

308. Ems, Ens, and Endpapers (G)

307. Deadline (G)

306. Composition (G)

305. Bed (G)

304. Against the Grain (G)

303. Use Proper English You’re Regarded as a Freak* (G)

302. Brooding* (G)

301. Babysitting (G)

300. Mistrusting My Inner Voice (G)

299. Time Travel (Birthdays and Birthday Books) (G)

298. On TP Rolls and Responsibility (G)

297. Metamorphosis? (G)

296. The Hundred-Foot Journey after Charlie Hebdo (G)

295. Changes (G)

294. Without Whom (G)

293. All the World’s a Stage (G)

292. No Returns (G)

291. Stone Root Lane (G)

290. Krishna’s Butterball (G)

289. Only So Much (G)

288. Bless Them (G)

287. Anywhere, anywhere (G)

286. Foxfire (G)

285. Sometimes a Coincidence (G)

284. Step by Step (G)

283. Categories or Continuums? (G)

282. It’s Only Temporary (G)

281. Invasion of the Potato Beetles (G)

280. My Love Affair with Penguins (G)

279. Raking, or In Praise of Puttering (G)

278. Going Back, Coming Home (G)

277. Waiting for Some Time (G)

276. India: Day 5 (G)

275. Doing it Themselves (G)

274. In the Dark (G)

273. Everyday Use (G)

272. Zindagi (G)

271. Yellowcake and other Euphemisms (G)

270. The Challenge of X (G)

269. Walls (G)

268. Variations, Variety, Vocab (G)

267. U and Non-U (G)
A visit to Sandringham

266. Tea (G)

265. Swagmen (G)

264. Railways, Real and Imagined (G)

263. Quiet (G)

262. Oh, to be in England (G)

261. Nostalgia (G)

260. Monuments (G)

259. London without Lily (G)

258. Kuchen (G)

257. (Leaving on a) Jet Plane (G)

256. Interior Design (G)

255. Holidays (G)

254. (On not knowing) German (G)

253. Food, Bremen-style (G)

252. In the Eurozone (G)

251. Deutschland (or Germany?) (G)

250. Culture (G)

249. Baggage (G)

248. Air Travel (G)
The start of a month-long journey and also the A-to-Z April challenge

247. Gauri Deshpande: A Distinctive Voice (G)
A tribute to the late Gauri Deshpande (1942-2003)  

246. On Not Knowing the Signs (G)

245. Welcome Home (G)

244. A Chip off the Old Block? If Only. (G)

243. On Making Things Up (G)

242. Gratitude (G)
On hearing of Pete Seeger’s death

241. People, Not Personalities (G)

240. Heaven’s Gate: Two Degrees of Separation (G)

239. No, It’s Not Political Incorrectness (G)

238. The Diabolical Idea of the Sale (G)

237. Turning Towards the Light (G)

236. Living Language: Changing, Impure (G)

235. December 5th, 2013 (G)
Remembering the global influence of Nelson Mandela on the sad occasion of his death

234. “Ah, bitter chill it was!” (G)

233. Rest In Peace, Doris Lessing (G)

232. Before Interstates, Before Automobiles (G)

231. Festivals of Light (G)

230. Enjoy Yourself (It’s Later than You Think) (G)

229. The Saga of the Sage-Green Couch (G)

228. The Mistress-Servant Relationship (G)

227. The Commanding Self (G)

226. Consider the lilies of the field (G)

225. Audit Alert! (G)

224. Play-Acting (G)

223. Darn It! (G)
No, Brave New World, mending is better than ending!

222. Dropping In (G)

221. Dressing for Others (G)

220. How’s Your GK? (G)
 As in General Knowledge: obsession with (India, 1960’s), lack thereof (US, 2010’s)

219. Palimpsest (G)
Reflections on layer upon layer of this fascinating word, delicious to roll around on the tongue; postcolonial theory

218. No Baby No Cry* (G)
 Did you go to your baby when it cried? 

217. Regularity (G)

216. The Third Age

215. Remembering Mrs. Metzger (G)
Tribute to an exceptional English teacher at Brookline High School

214.  A Moment in Time (G)

213. Censorship at Bedtime (G)

212. ¡Viva La Literatura! (G)
Mexico Olympics, Tlatelolco Massacre (October 2, 1968), Black Power Salute/Human Rights Protest, 1968 Olympics, Howl Festival, New York (Mexico/USA/UK)

211. Bad Behavior on the Bus (G)

210. The Potters’ Tale (G)
Serendipity and synchronicity

209. Retreat (G)

208. Zee, Zed, Go to Bed (G)

207. The Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò (G)

206. Xenophobia (G)

205. Weeping Willow (G)

204. Victory V’s (G)
In my youth the slogan for the Victory V lozenge was, “It’s got a kick like a mule!” One look at the ingredients shows why.

203. Ultra (G)

202. Tennessee Stud (G)
A tribute to Doc Watson

201. Screaming Women (G)
Prime-time TV

200. Roots, Rock, Reggae (G)
The rise of reggae music, 1960s/1970s (UK/USA)

199. Quest (G)
Reflection on a word, and on its perversion

198. The Post Office (G)
Efficiency, importance, defunding, and decline of the Post Office 19th Century, 1950s/1960s/1980s/2010s (UK/USA)

197. O, Oh, and The Wonderful O (G)

196. Never No More (G)

195.  Marathon (G)

194. London, My London (G)

193. Kindling (G)

192. Jam Today (G)
Anti-nuclear movement, 1970s/1980s (USA)

191. The Iliad at Bedtime (G)
When my son was little, I got it into my head that I was going to read him the epics of the world at bedtime.

190. Hobson-Jobson (G)

189. Goodness Gracious Me! (G)
British Asian community, TV comedy, 1990s (UK)

188. Finn Family Moomintroll (G)
Favorite childhood books, Tove Jansson’s Moominvalley and its worldview

187. Emil and the Detectives (G)
A childhood favorite, Puffin Books

186. Drive-ins (G)
Culture, decline of an institution 1970s/1980s/2000s (USA)

185. Common Sense (G)

184. Brevity (G)

183. Autoantonyms (G)

182. Hot Cross Buns (G)

181. The Silver Hairpin (G)

180. The Magic of Found Objects (G)
Is anything ever lost?
Bicentennial of American Revolution, People’s Bicentennial Commission, Concord 1976 (USA)

179. And he laughing said to me (G)
Putting William Blake to music,  inspiration (USA, 1970s)

178. Talkin’ ’bout My Generation (G)
Culture, values of 1950s-born generation (India/UK/USA)

177. The Sugar Snow (G)
Maple-syruping, 1960s/1980/s/90’s (India/USA)

176. The Haircut (G)

175. Make It So! (G)

174. Con Men, Card Sharks, and Playing a Different Game (G)
Con-men, Richard Canfield, The Sting, Paul Newman and Robert Redford (USA)

173. Multi-Timing (G)

172. Balancing My Three Halves (G)

171. Dashing Away with the Smoothing Iron (G)

170. Sighting in New Mexico (G)
UFOs, Roswell Incident 1947, Area 51, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Stealth Bomber 1970s (USA)

169.  At the Gates of Dawn (G)

168. The Fast-Wind Backwards (G)

167. Diary-keeping (G)

166. In the Bleak Midwinter (G)

165. What’s in a Name? (G)

164. Pheasants and Apple Chutney (G)

163. Servants, or Cleaning My Own D*** House! (G)

162. “Heuch, Heuch!” (and other family lingo) (G)

161. Watching the River Flow (G)

160. Dogfight (G)
Indo-Pak War of 1967 (India)

159. Ordinary People (G)

158. The Pagli and the Tramp
Two rare experiences of difference being accepted, one in India, the other in the U.S.

157. The Day Mick Jagger Called (G)
Perhaps my biggest claim to fame (USA, 1970s)

156. Just Empty your Mind

155. Saving my Bacon (G)

154. Saraswati and Sari-wearing (G)

153. Piecing It All Together (G)

152. No Swaddling, Please! (G)

151. Correspondences and Convergence (“Chicks Can’t Dig!”) (G)

150. The Phenomenon (G)

149.  Get Me to the Church on Time (G)

148. Avoiding the Plague (G)
Plague outbreak Ratnagiri 1939/40, Vaccination, diphtheria, smallpox, polio (India/UK/USA/Greece)

147. Hollyhocks and Hornworms (G)

146. Life on the Low Wire (G)

145. Just a little is enough (G)

144. The Blab-Off (G)

143. Waste Not, Want Not (G)

142. Route 66 (G)
Traveling that historic route 1970s, 2000s (USA)

141. The Yogi of Beals Street (G)
Yoga, Indian immigrant, 1970s (USA)

140. Music Alone Shall Live (G)

139. Sealed with a Kiss (G)
Changing practices, Valentine’s Day, 1960s/1990s (India/Greece/USA)

138. Learning How (Not) to See (G)

137. A Victorian Frame of Mind (G)
Old-school pedagogy, 1970s (USA)

136. The Shame of Self-Censorship (G)
Dangerous Reading, Harry Potter, The Satanic Verses, Salman Rushdie, 1980s/1990s/2010s (UK/USA, India)

135. Doris Lessing and Me (G)
Tribute from an unabashed fan of the great DL

134. Darshan, or You Never Can Tell (G)
Fonteyn & Nureyev, Athens 1962, Halley’s Comet 1986, Edward Said 1999 (Greece/USA)

133. So Many Things Have Disappeared (G)
Disappearing cultural practices, trades, institutions 1930s/1960s/1990s (India)

132. My Muddle (G)

131. Across the Miles (G)
Declining practice of sending Christmas/New Year cards, 1960s, 2010s (India/UK/USA)

130. Orwellian Jingles (G)

129. Good Morning, Rainy Day (G)

128. The Kurta Joke G)

127. Going Up the Country (G)
Back-to-the-land movement 1970s/1980s (USA)

126. Word Choice: Does it Matter? (G)

125. My Autograph Book (G)
Autograph books, history and use, 1960s (India/UK)

124. A Meditation on Money (G)

123. That Funny Accent (G)

122. The Land of the Free—Really? (G)

121. The Taste of Home (G)

120. I once was lost (and wish I still were) (G)

119. Top of the Pops, 1968-69 (G)
Top of the Pops, BBC television, pop music charts,1960s (UK)

118. Racist Bracist (G)

117. Personal Space, Indian-Style (G)

116. Medicinal Herbs (G)

115. An Immigrant’s Reflections on Independence Day (G)
Meanings and practice of Independence Day, Indian, Indian American, American 1960s/1980s/2010s (India/USA)

114. Food for People , Not for Profit (G)
The Food Cooperative Movement, 1970s (USA)

113. Riding Like the Wind (G)
Bicycles & bicycle culture, 1950s/1960s (India)

112. Хоттабыч in India (G)
Russian books in India, Soviet Era, 1960s (India)

111. Strawberry-Picking Camp (G)
Student farm camp, NUS 1940s (UK)

110. The Party (G)

109 Hindi Lessons (G)
Hindi, post-Independence (India)

108. Climb Over the Wall! (G)

107. Kalo Paska (G)

106. Slow: Salamander Crossing (G)

105. My Garden of Forking Paths (G)

104. Untangling (G)

103. Holi, Water Play, Rites of Spring (G)

102. No Nuclear News (G)
Anti-nuclear movement 1970s/1980s (USA)

101. The Japan Syndrome (G)
Fukushima 2011, Chernobyl 1986, Three Mile Island 1979, Vermont Yankee 2011 (Japan/Ukraine/USA)

100. My American Epiphany
(USA, 1990s)

99. Paharganj, January 1984
1984 massacre of Sikhs, Delhi (India)

98. Oral Culture (so to speak) (G)

97. Sick in Bed (G)

96. Learning to Swim (G)
(Greece, 1960s)

95. Sail On, Silver Girl

94. My Uncrowned Queens (G)
Queen Elizabeth II’s Coronation, 1953, Royal Weddings 1981, 2011 (UK)

93. Snowed In (G)

92. Cookbooks, Immigrants, and Improvisation (G)
Indian Americans, Indian immigrants, 1970s (USA)

91. Tunneling (G)

90. “Almost a Dude” (G)

89. Make Love, Not Clockwork Devil-Doggery (G)

88. Sisters, Pick Up Your Sisters (G)
Women’s Movement, hitchhiking, 1970s (USA)

87. Thanda Thanda Pani or, You Never Miss Your Water… (G)
Daily rituals, water use, 1960s/1990s (India)

86. Bottled Sunshine (G)

85. St. Nicholas’ Day (G)

84. Feasting or Fasting? (G)
November 26, 1970, Native American National Day of Mourning, Thanksgiving (USA)

83. A Clear, Cold New England Day

82. What’s Your Bag? (G)

81. St. Catherine’s and Miss Tutte (G)

80. Who Are You? (G)

79. Baths, Bathing, and Hot Water Bottles (G)
Cultural history of baths & bathing (UK/India)

78. October Rains (G)

77. The Tea Tasting (G)

76. Say it Again (G)

75. The Long Journey (G)
Traveling to Ratnagiri, 1950s/1960s (India)

74. Three Towers, Three Coincidences
Remembering World Trade Center Attacks, 9/11/01 (USA)

73. Trouble (G)

72. Learnin’ the Blues (G)

71. Simply Paying Attention

70. Party Pieces (G)
Self-entertainment vs. goggling the TV (UK/India/US)

69. Wonders in the Woods (G)

68. Frittered!

67. Fiasco on the 715 (G)

66. The Mango Room (G)

65. Curb Your Enthusiasm: A Bedtime Story (G)

64. Concert Collage (G)

63. Secrecy and Velvet Bugs (G)
Communication, pre-electronic media, 1960s (India)

62. Regulation Underwear (G)
Educational reform, primary schools 1960s (UK)

61. Burma-Shave Signs (G)
Anti-nuclear protest, 1970s (USA)

60. Cod-Liver Oil and Malt (G)

59. Childhood Scars

58. Southbound

57. Toughening Up

56. International Arrivals (G)

55. Quick-Change Artist
Summer jobs (USA, 1970s)

54. Flash

53. Sucking Lemons and Quoting Shaw (G)
My parents in 1930s England, 1930s/1940s India

52. Himalaya (G)

51. Getting Out of Silver City (G)
A hair-raising experience (New Mexico, USA, 2000s)

50. Learning How to Fold (G)

49. Making Sense of the Movies (G)

48. Jaggery Coconut, Nectar of the Gods (G)

47. The Paper Round (G)

46. My Ink-Smudged Youth (G)
Writing with fountain pens, 1960s

45. A Macabre Imagination?

44. Greece in the 60s: Expats and Other Animals (G)
Expatriate life in Athens, 1960s, Doxiadis (Greece)

43. From a Railway Carriage (G)
Train travel in the 1960s, 1990s (India)

42. The Times Tables (G)
Old and new methods for learning the multiplication tables 1920s/1960s/1990s (India/USA)

41. Eating for Four (G)
Cooking for myself for the first time (UK, 1970s)

40. send my roots rain (G)

39. Two at a Time (G)

38. Study Halls and Cinchona (G)

37. Grandpa Victor and the Story of the Tomatoes
Ukrainian immigration to New York, bringing tomatoes to the Old World, 1890s/early 1900s (USA/Ukraine)

36. My Grandmother

35. The Nation (G)
Nation/nationalism 1960s, Tribals, land rights (India)

34. His Master’s Voice (G)

33. A Nice Bit of Spanish (G)

32. My Wrestling Career

31. Gas-Station Shirts (G)

30. Land of Enchantment (G)

29. Incident at the Donner Pass (G)
Donner Pass 1977, Donner Party 1846, Living Love Center Berkeley (USA)

28. Pre-dawn Adventures (G)

27. Rumpelstiltskin (G)

26. Dolls I Have Loved (and Lost) (G)

25. British TV, Fall of ‘63 (G)
British TV: adverts, The Beatles, Assassination of JFK, Dr. Who

24. Hidden Places (G)

23. Brackish Water and Cherry Soda (G)

22. Mushrooming and Berry-Picking (G)

21. The Highlanders (G)

20. The Bay of Biscay and the Gully Gully Man (G)
P&O ocean liners, UK-India 1950s, Suez canal, gully-gully man

19. Lively Up Yourself (G)

18. Songlines (G)

17. Chickens on the Pot
Evacuation to St. Albans, Second World War (UK)

16. Tree Elf

15. Humans—What a Bummer! (G)

14. Everett the Ice Man (G)

13. Paradise Lost
   A jarring end to a Scottish idyll
1980s Scottish practice sites, low-flying planes, RAF, NATO (UK)

12. Following the Elephant Spoor (G)
Mid-1960s: An afternoon in the forest outside Hijli campus, Kharagpur

11. The Napkin Collection
   Athens, early 1960’s: I started a local craze in my neighborhood with a strange collection, especially for boys.

10. Ghosts of New Boston
The Hurricane of 1938, Birch Hill Dam, New Boston, Massachusetts (USA)

9. The Golden Boy

8. Bad Role Model
   Early 1970s: first encounter with the fuzz

7. The Comic Shed (G)
1960s: childhood reading, Hijli campus, Kharagpur

6. Morse’s Supermarket
 1970s: Coolidge Corner, Brookline

5. Idolizing Princess Anne (G)
1974: another episode from a year in London

4. The Tree House (G)
Our teenage  sanctuary

3. The Horn Player in the Cupboard (G)
1974: Living in London with old high-school friends

2. The Leather Welding Jacket
   Eve the ace seamstress and Weezy the pioneering female welder

1. Letting Go of the Clutch (G)
(Mis)adventures with the old milk truck

 

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